John McGuinness suspected of Broken Leg after North West 200 Crash

 John McGuinness aka “The King of The Mountain” was reported to have suffered a crash during a practice session at the 2017 North West 200 race.

His Honda Racing Team reportedly tweeted that the 23-times Isle of Man TT winner is on the way to the hospital with a possible broken right leg.

The status of McGuinness to race alongside Guy Martin at the 2017 Isle of Man TT at the end of the month hangs in the balance for the “Morecombe Missile”.

John McGuinness (TT Legends Honda) celebrates winning today’s Superbike TT on the Isle of Man. (Image source: Stephen Davison)

With the 2017 Isle of Man Tourist Trophy just around the corner, bad news filled the road racing scene as John McGuinness aka “The King of the Mountain” suffered a crash during the North West 200 race during yesterday evening’s practice session earlier today according to a report made by BBC.

Image source: IOMTT

Following the crash, the 23-times Isle of Man TT winner was said to be conscious and on the way to the hospital in Northern Ireland with a suspected broken leg according to McGuinness’s Honda Racing Team who tweeted the incident.

The North West 200 race organizers also stated that the 45-year-old road racer has been taken to the Royal Victoria Hospital located in Belfast for further treatment. There are 15 different sections of the road race circuit and John McGuinness suffered the crash at the Primrose Hill section right before the practice session is scheduled to end.

While we are not sure on the current situation of the Isle of Man TT legend and his condition, his status to race the brand new Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP2 alongside his newly acquired team-mate, Guy Martin, hangs in jeopardy as this year’s event is scheduled to start at the end of the month on the 27 May 2017.

CLICK HERE to know more about the 2017 Isle of Man Honda dream team.

Stay tuned to Bikes Republic for more updates.

--Ads--

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here